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Reread Books

In the run up to exams in a few months, my life has turned super busy again.
So once again, I turn to wiser people and the things that inspire me, to keep my writing habit going :)

Let’s start with Ryan Holiday.
In his post, Ryan Holiday Picks 20 Books to Help You Live Better in 2020, he concludes with a sage paragraph on the benefits of re reading books that matter.

When I wrapped up my list of books last year, I made one final recommendation that I will repeat this year. Whether you read any of the books above or not — this year or next year — I do think you would be vastly improved by the experience of picking three or four titles that have had a big impact on you in the past and commit to reading them again. Seneca talked about the need to “linger among a limited number of master thinkers, and digest their works, if you would derive ideas which shall win firm hold in your mind.”

And no matter how many times you read a certain book, you never read the exact same book twice because you change from one reading to the next. So this year, go reread To Kill A Mockingbird. Give The Odyssey another chance. Sit with a few chapters from the 48 Laws of Power. See how these books have stood the test of time, and see how your perspective differs from when you read them last.

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P.P.S. Feed my insatiable reading habit.


#100DaysOfCode, Day 037 – Videos, final day

Finished up all the video watching.
Will start with tiny projects, an hour at a time tomorrow onwards.

Today I learnt about,

  1. basics of databases in Python with SQLite3
  2. data visualisation uisng Plotly
  3. full stack webapps with Anvil (did not quite grok this)
  4. creating a small inventory app
  5. accessing and driving databases with SQLAlchemy
  6. building basic gui apps using Gooey
  7. using JSON apis

Will obviously be rehashing and revisiting all I saw and read and learnt over the next sixty odd days.

#100DaysOfCode, Day 036 – Videos again

Think the plan is to do another mini marathon over the holidays and finish watching the course videos too.
Because I need to pick up studies for my adult school too. 3 subjects to cover.

So probably will finish watcing all the videos over the next two days and then start dedicating a hobby hour every day to actually write and practice the projects.
Now that I can actually write code, it has turned into an enjoyable activity.

I can now turn the rest of my focus to studies so that I can finish those exams in April.
An hour or two a day with Python should definitely get me fluent, I think. Let’s see.

Today I learnt

  1. How to programmatically use the Twitter API
  2. How to programmatically access the Github API
  3. How to send emails using smtplib
  4. Do copy and paste using Pyperclip
  5. Do basic Excel automation using openpyxl
  6. Drive web tasks using Selenium
  7. the basics of Flask

Good day, methinks.
Lots more to learn tomorrow.

#100DaysOfCode, Day 034 – Watched Videos

Watched videos

  1. On how to process CSV data
  2. how to procoss JSON in Python
  3. how to consume HTTP services in Python
  4. how to scrape web pages with Beautiful Soup 4.
  5. how to profile a Python program using the cprofile module
  6. and finally how to parse RSS feeds using Feedparser.

Seems like the Python learning flywheel is slowly gaining momentum.


#100DaysOfCode, Days 030, 031, 032 & 033 – Read Fluent Python

Since I am still in consumption, holiday, non work, mode, decided to finally dust off and read the final paperback Python textbook, I had.

Fluent Python is a must read, and an an awesome addition to the beginner to intermediate programmer’s arsenal.

Luciano has a clear voice, definite opinions and a huge amount of experience.
Besides the actual content, he links to a wide range of resources, from articles, blog posts, and mailing list entries to videos on the web. Enough to keep you busy for months on end.
Definitely someone worth paying attention to and learning from.

Best to tackle this book, once you know the basics and have some working knowledge of writing code.
And then best to keep returning to the book every six months to a year or so.
I know I will.